Open Access Week in Pittsburgh wrap-up

OAlogoWow, what an Open Access Week! There were so many great events going on around the globe, but I want to share my wrap-up of our activities here at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University.

We kicked off our celebration a week early on October 15th with a lecture from Dr. Sheila Corrall of Pitt’s iSchool. Her talk, entitled The Open Movement in Higher Education, was a broad overview of where the Open Movement started, where it went, and where it is going. I got a lot out of this talk. There is a recording available if you want to watch it yourself!

The marquee event at Pitt, co-sponsored by CMU, was a panel discussion on Open Peer Review entitled In Broad Daylight: Innovation and Transparency in Peer Review. Our esteemed panel included: Brandon Stell of PubPeer, Larry Kane representing the University of Pittsburgh and F1000 Research, Lenny Teytelman of Protocols.io, and Josh Nicholson from The Winnower. Our panel was moderated by Jackie Smith, Professor of Sociology at Pitt and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of World-Systems Research (and also a friend of the library). Besides a really great session, I also had the privilege of showing our panelists around the University (including our beautiful Cathedral of Learning) and having two meals with them. I was able to participate in so many excellent conversations about many different topics, and I think that was the highlight of the week for me. A recording of our panel presentation is available here.

Carnegie Mellon hosted two presentations by Francine Berman of the Research Data Alliance on the need for a healthy ecosystem for data stewardship, preservation, and use. We’re still in the process of getting the presentation materials uploaded, but stay tuned to the following links for more information:
Got Data? Building a Sustainable Ecosystem for Data Driven Research
The Research Data Alliance: Building Community and Infrastructure for Data Sharing World-wide

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“Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh” by Lauren B. Collister, CC-BY

Finally, I participated during the week as well. I gave a talk for the local chapter of the Special Libraries Association which was attended by librarians from all types of libraries, including public libraries, corporate libraries, academic libraries. Inspired by the library ethos of “Free to the People,” the idea behind my talk was to present different ideas for small steps that librarians of all kinds can take to being more open. We had a fantastic discussion and several new links were made among participants. I also had a really great time learning about particular challenges faced by different kinds of libraries. If you’d like to view the presentation materials, here is the record of my talk “Open for All: Embracing Open in Your Library”.

Believe it or not, we have ONE MORE event to go: The Colloquium on Open Data and Research Futures. This will be this Thursday, October 29, at the Mellon Institute Library at Carnegie Mellon and will be a discussion of the role of Open Data in the future of research. For more information about the event, click here.

That concludes my wrap-up of Open Access Week in Pittsburgh! How was your OA Week?